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Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Even if you have a full-time job, there’s nothing wrong with putting a little extra cash in your pocket. It’s not about greed: Having an additional income stream means that you get out of debt or fatten your savings.

But, there’s another possible outcome. You may be able to make this into a bonafide full-time job. That means you can be your own boss or generate a passive income.

If you never thought about this before, 2020 should have opened your eyes — especially if you’re struggling as a business owner or have unfortunately lost your main source of income. The Covid-19 pandemic has shown that life can drastically change in the blink of an eye. …


“Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise” — Ben Franklin, famously

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Recently, reader Rob asked me about my habit of waking at 4:30 a.m. each day and asked me to write about the health benefits of rising early, which I thought was an excellent question. Unfortunately, there are none, that I know of.

However, there are a ton of other great benefits.

Now, let me first say that if you are a night owl, and that works for you, I think that’s great. There’s no reason to change, especially if you’re happy with it. But for me, switching from being a night owl to an early riser (and yes, it is possible) has been a godsend. It has helped me in so many ways that I’d never go back. …


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Growing up in Minsk, in the nineteen-eighties, the poet Valzhyna Mort spoke Russian at home and studied Belarusian in school. Now she has written a collection of poems, “ Music for the Dead and Resurrected,” in English. All the same, Mort insists that she does not know any of the three languages particularly well. “Luckily, I very strongly hang onto the idea that poetry does not come from language, but rather from the unsayable, from the untranslatable,” she told the Guardian last year. …


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A historic meeting between Israel’s prime minister and Saudi Arabia’s crown prince has sent a strong signal to allies and enemies alike that the two countries remain deeply committed to containing their common foe Iran.

Last Sunday’s covert meeting in the Saudi city of Neom, confirmed by Israeli officials but publicly denied by Riyadh, conveyed a coordinated message to the United States President-elect Joe Biden that Washington’s main allies in the region are closing ranks.

It was the first publicly confirmed visit to Saudi Arabia by an Israeli leader and a meeting that was unthinkable until recently as the two countries do not have formal diplomatic relations. But it underlines the depth of the two countries’ concerns about Iran and shows how opposition to Tehran is bringing about a strategic realignment of countries in the Middle East. …


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Why does one person get choked up over a Hallmark commercial, while another sheds tears only for the death of a loved one? Does the exhortation “Have a good cry” carry physiological or psychological merit? And how do crying behaviors differ among cultures and between the sexes?

New research by psychologists is beginning to answer these questions, helping us better understand what human tears mean from social, psychological, and neuroscientific perspectives.

“I think the study of crying, more than is the case for any other emotional expression, may help us to obtain a better insight into human nature,” says leading tear researcher Ad Vingerhoets, Ph.D., …


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When biting into a juicy burger, most people likely don’t realize that the history of this seemingly simple meal spans multiple continents and can be traced back almost a thousand years. Much like the United States, the country with which it’s inextricably linked, the humble hamburger is a product of myriad cultural influences, entrepreneurial ingenuity, creativity born of necessity, and a disputed origin story. To give you a greater appreciation for the next one you order — and fun facts to share with friends — we dug deep into the fascinating backstory of the burger.

Road Trip Snack for Mongols?

Genghis Khan might not spring to mind when ordering a Quarter Pounder with a side of fries, but the ruthless Mongol leader may have helped pave the way for the hamburger in the early 13th century. Khan’s massive army of horsemen, known as the “Golden Horde,” was a fast-moving cavalry that often traveled for days without getting off their horses. Like anyone on a lengthy journey, they needed something convenient they could eat with one hand along the way. …


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There’ve been months of negotiations between the US and the Taliban to try to end the conflict and reach a peace deal in Afghanistan.

President Donald Trump has often said that he’s keen to bring soldiers home from America’s longest-running war.

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We are working to finally end America’s longest war and bring our troops back home.

Donald Trump
US President

So we’ve been looking at how much the US has spent in Afghanistan since the war began.

What forces did the US send?

The US invaded Afghanistan in October 2001 to oust the Taliban, whom they said were harboring Osama bin Laden and other al-Qaeda figures linked to the 9/11 attacks. …


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A series of sackings and appointments — with rumors of more to come — has created a sense of deep uncertainty around the US intelligence and national security community.

While some outside that world has raised fears that this is part of an attempt by the president to hold on to power, many on the inside see it more as driven by a desire for personal revenge and the latest stage of a conflict that has done much to define Donald Trump’s presidency.

But there remain fears that the uncertainty of a divisive transition could hold real dangers.

The sacking of a raft of top civilian leaders at the Pentagon, including the secretary of defense, was, many believe, just the start. …


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America may well be divided about Donald Trump, but the rest of the world isn’t. The soon-to-be-former president has gotten high marks in the Philippines and Israel, a passing grade in a couple of African countries and India, and dismal reviews pretty much everywhere else. US allies in Europe and Asia are particularly relieved that Joe Biden will be taking the helm in January. The mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, summed up world sentiment with a pithy tweet: “Welcome back, America.”

The international community is happy that the American people have taken down the world’s biggest bully. The heads of international bodies — from the World Health Organization to Human Rights Watch — are delighted that soon Trump won’t be undermining their missions. Perhaps the 2020 presidential election will inspire people elsewhere to dethrone their lesser bullies like Viktor Orban in Hungary, Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, Narendra Modi in India, even Vladimir Putin in Russia. Short of that, however, the removal of Trump from the international scene will restore a measure of decorum and predictability to global affairs. …


Without basic income, people will die. With basic income, people will thrive.

by SCOTT SANTENS

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commondreams.org

Flaten the curve…

We’ve heard that phrase repeatedly as a result of the novel coronavirus in regards to the healthcare system. There are only so many healthcare workers, only so many hospitals with a limited number of rooms and beds, only so many ventilators and PPE. Because of these limits, we have to avoid surpassing them by stretching out the number of coronavirus infections over a longer amount of time.

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We’ve heard that phrase repeatedly as a result of the novel coronavirus in regards to the healthcare system. There are only so many healthcare workers, only so many hospitals with a limited number of rooms and beds, only so many ventilators and PPE. Because of these limits, we have to avoid surpassing them by stretching out the number of coronavirus infections over a longer amount of time.Flattening that particular curve is something the public and governments both understand. A curve understood by far too few however is our safety net’s. There are only so many welfare workers, only so much website capacity, only so many phone lines and people to answer them. Because of these limits, we should avoid surpassing them too, by avoiding millions of people applying simultaneously for welfare programs as a result of their incomes evaporating, as spending on goods and services grinds to a crawl. …

About

Iqra Mukhtar

Student of English literature, Treatise Versifier, Content Writer. Passionate about writing my own ideas and to share it with the public.

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